At a time when more of the world’s children are growing up in cities than ever before, the Bernard van Leer Foundation is working with city governments around the world to find new and scalable ways to make cities child-friendly as part of its Urban95 programme. One of the tools used by cities as they collect more data is a “dashboard”:...Read more
|Comment|author: Emma Martinho-Truswell

Building the prefab schools of the future

Prefab technology is driving the development of new classrooms in Australia that are a world away from the old “portables” you may remember. Access to schools with high-quality classrooms and safe learning environments is something every...Read more
|Comment|author: Dr David Heath and Dr Tharaka Gunawardena

Designing Australia’s largest school in Melbourne

Melbourne architects are transforming our schools, with a new inner-city learning precinct to teach children from kindergarten to university. When populations explode, meeting the community’s education needs is a challenge. As local schools reach bursting point,...Read more
|Comment|author: Sara Brocklesby
CC Flickr: James Emery

Children and play based learning

Children learn best when they’re having fun, and they are more likely to be having fun when they are playing. Children’s learning is optimal when they’re free to learn at their own pace and in their...Read more
|Comment|author: Melbourne Graduate School of Education
Flickr CC: COD Newsroom

Early intervention increases educational gains for inner city children

Researchers followed the 30-year progress of 989 children who attended the Child-Parent Centers program in inner-city Chicago as preschoolers. Their findings suggest preventive interventions beginning in early childhood can promote long-term educational success that contributes...Read more
|Comment|author: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Toddlers need books, and lots of conversation

Learning outcomes in the first two to three years of life have been shown to have a huge impact on children’s ongoing educational achievement. Children as young as two who fall behind their peers in intellectual...Read more
|Comment|author: Katherine Smith